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TaLI Stakeholder Engagement in Midlands Province

TaLI, Tag a Life, Girl Child, Girl Child Rights in Zimbabwe, Child Marriages in Zimbabwe, Nyaradzo Mashayamombe, Nyari Mashayamombe, Human Rights Activists in Africa, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Chilren's Rights, African Union, Children's Rights, Child Marriages in Southern Africa, Child Marriages in Africa, Girls Education in Zimbabwe, Girl Child in Zimbabwe, Women's Rights in Zimbabwe, Girls in Midlands Province Zimbabwe, Ministry of Education, UNFPA Zimbabwe, UNICEF Zimbabwe, HIV in girls in Zimbabwe, Girls Sexual Reproductive Health, Women's Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Human Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Children's Rights, TaLI Theory of Change, Girls in Tech, Girls in STERM in Zimbabwe, Lazarus Dokora, UN Women

TaLI team recently engaged a number of stakeholders in the Midlands Province in light of the ongoing current economic difficulties which has affected the organisation together with many CSOs in Zimbabwe regarding capacity to deliver their programmes to community. Like one of the many currently resource constrained, the organisation realises the need to tap into creativity to be able to keep serving its constituency thus the girls and young women in Zimbabwe, ensuring that services such as Comprehensive Sexual Education is addressed, Psycho Social Support for Victims of abuse is provided or atleast referrals are made to ensure girls and young women access these services among other objectives the organisation seek to meet for girls. The organisation notes the increased school drop out, thousands of children who are still out of the school system, child marriages and is engaging in dialogues with relevant authorities to highlight and address the problems.

Of some of the interventions TaLI will engage in to address the ongoing resource challenges, the organisation is tapping into its own partnerships which the organisations built since its establishment in 2009 thus providing its technical expertise in girls, young women and youths issues to those with resources such as semi-government organisations which are currently funded. The organisation is also tapping into the creation of consortiums with other NGOs thus local and international to create programmes that can be fund raised together for. TaLI also is working flat out to engage other creative forms of sustainable fundraising to ensure the support of its operations.

“It is heart warming to realise the kind of relationships that TaLI has established over the years and see them paying off in such times of need” said the TaLI Executive Director and Founder, Miss Nyaradzo Mashayamombe after a number of meetings with stakeholders in the Midlands Province. It is clear that the work of TaLI is appreciated within the province, inspite of some of the operational and access challenges the organisation together with others sometimes face in certain communities in seeking to reach intended audiences. While the economic environment is strained in Zimbabwe and while usual donors are refocusing their attention on their own countries and other issues, it is clear that Africans like many countries in the South have to come up with more internal solutions in addressing resource creation for community development.

TaLI is confident that the established partnerships, powered by dedicated team will drive the new 2016 to 2020 Strategic Plan to ensure communities are safe for the girls and young women.


International Day of the Girl Child

TaLI, Tag a Life, Girl Child, Girl Child Rights in Zimbabwe, Child Marriages in Zimbabwe, Nyaradzo Mashayamombe, Nyari Mashayamombe, Human Rights Activists in Africa, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Chilren's Rights, African Union, Children's Rights, Child Marriages in Southern Africa, Child Marriages in Africa, Girls Education in Zimbabwe, Girl Child in Zimbabwe, Women's Rights in Zimbabwe, Girls in Midlands Province Zimbabwe, Ministry of Education, UNFPA Zimbabwe, UNICEF Zimbabwe, HIV in girls in Zimbabwe, Girls Sexual Reproductive Health, Women's Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Human Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Children's Rights, TaLI Theory of Change, Girls in Tech, Girls in STERM in Zimbabwe, Lazarus Dokora, UN Women

11 October 2016

World over, girls are faced with enormous challenges, and each continent has its specific issues which perpetuate these vulnerabilities. While these challenges come in shapes and faces that are different continentally, the end results are often the same for girls ranging from; high maternal mor-tality rates for those below the age of 24, HIV continues to be the face of girls, young women and women, with UN AIDS siting that 15% of women living with HIV are aged 15–24, of whom 80% live in sub-Saharan Africa. More challenges include illiteracy with many countries still struggling to en-sure access to primary and secondary education.

Comprehensive Sexual reproductive health and rights for young people especially young women remain a politically heated debate especially for Zimbabwe with the leaders struggling to come to terms with the fact that young people are having sex at a very early stage and therefore deserve access to reproductive information and services. Child marriages are at the centre of the global agenda as a result of the fact that more than 30% of women are married before their 18th birthday and we have seen that in Zimbabwe the same can be said regarding the importance that the coun-try seems to place the issue of the child marriages; what remains to be seen are resources that are allocated to the issue. The justice system has yet to act urgently to ensure the alignment of the constitution to make administration of the laws that protect children from marriage are in place. Patriarchal societies sponsored by corruption, negative religious and cultural practices continue to expose girls to discrimination and the untold suffering.

The 11th of October each year marks the International Day of the Girl Child, a day that the United Nations Secretary General, Ban-ki-moon in 2012 set aside to annually acknowledge the challenges that the girl child faces and in Zimbabwe, organisations like TaLI welcome this commemoration as it acknowledges the challenges girls in Zimbabwe and Africa face, as they work to make com-munities and the world safe for the girls. Running under the theme ‘Girls progress = Goals progress, Generation Data’, the United Nations acknowledges that when girls progress the sustainable development goals progress too. In Zimbabwe, Africa and all developing countries, communities are held together by women, and the girls today are women tomorrow.

It makes simple sense that in the next fifteen years for the Zimbabwe to move forward, the country has to invest smartly in girls and young women, to ensure that the communities have empowered women who are ready to contribute just like men, to the development of their own families, com-munities, national and the world. Today the world is run by founders and Chief Executive Officers of Multinational Corporations, Non Governmental Organisations, Donor Agencies, States, Business, Entrepreneurs, Artists, Scientists, Engineers who are women, and it is known that when women lead, there is less corruption and bad governance. In Zimbabwe a few women have made it to the top and a few are part of important decision making processes. Investment should be made urgently, to promote equity and equally in the lives of girls and young women, not only as a human rights issue, but as a moral obligation; to advance the lives of girls, ensure equal, fair opportunities for young women and black women in employment and financial resources in every field.

In Africa, the biggest scourge that takes away majority of the developing world’s efforts from the advancement of the rights of girls and young women, as well as women in general is the corruption, bad governance and lack of accountability by leaders. For example, Zimbabwe has gone through untold corruption by officials with the President Robert Mugabe acknowledging a $15billion US dollars disappearing from the diamond mining, and that is believed only to be a tip of an ice-burg. What that money would have achieved for an economy such as Zimbabwe would be to ensure that the industries that are closing down everyday are assisted to keep afloat and ensure jobs. If there was good governance in these countries, officials would account, and we would see corrupt officials fired from public offices.

Girls and all children would remain in school because the governments would be able to pay for every child’s education right through high school as provided by in most constitutions. Women wouldn't have to die giving birth like in most of these countries such as those in Southern Africa; Zimbabwe, Malawi, Swaziland, Lesotho, Namibia, Mozambique due to poor health facilities. Au-thorities would promote accountability and girls and all young people would be encouraged to en-gaged with local leaders engaging them to account for their efforts to develop their communities. The young people themselves would have a chance to become leaders in their community and their nations, and there wouldn't be police brutality to citizens whose leaders acknowledge the role of youths including young women, in exercising their constitutional rights and wanting to know how their leaders govern their resources.

As the world moves to emphasise data generation around empowerment of girls and young wom-en, we encourage the country to interrogate the meaning of ‘literacy’ where basic reading and writ-ing seems not to mean real development as countries such as Zimbabwe with a literacy rate of above 92% seem to have the worst citizens affected by poverty and diseases. Literacy must trans-late to meaningful development, and contribute to the demographic dividend, which seems to only happen when someone reaches a minimum of secondary school. While we celebrate this year’s edition of the International Day of the Girl Child, we encourage the government of Zimbabwe to open more spaces for accountability, take action against perpetrators of corruption openly, en-courage constitutionalism, promote a child focuses national budget to invest in social protection of children and the justice system, as well as make education to secondary level free for all especially the vulnerable groups.


TaLI CELEBRATES THE YOUNGEST UNIVERSITY GRAUNT IN ZIMBABWE, MAUD CHIFAMBA

TaLI, Tag a Life, Girl Child, Girl Child Rights in Zimbabwe, Child Marriages in Zimbabwe, Nyaradzo Mashayamombe, Nyari Mashayamombe, Human Rights Activists in Africa, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Chilren's Rights, African Union, Children's Rights, Child Marriages in Southern Africa, Child Marriages in Africa, Girls Education in Zimbabwe, Girl Child in Zimbabwe, Women's Rights in Zimbabwe, Girls in Midlands Province Zimbabwe, Ministry of Education, UNFPA Zimbabwe, UNICEF Zimbabwe, HIV in girls in Zimbabwe, Girls Sexual Reproductive Health, Women's Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Human Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Children's Rights, TaLI Theory of Change, Girls in Tech, Girls in STERM in Zimbabwe, Lazarus Dokora, UN Women

30 September 2016

Tag a Life International (TaLI) joins Maud Chifamba, the Chifamba family and the rest of Zimbabwe in Celebrating her achievement, the youngest University Graduate in Zimbabwe to complete her first Degree in Accounting at the age of 18. The organisation takes a moment to acknowledge the potential the girl child has to make history and to improve their own lives when given a chance. Maud Chifamba has a rare story, one mixed with difficulty and determination, unusual intelligence and genius which amazes all that hear her story. She is the epitome of all things possible, and a symbol of reflection for all, both adults and children, of the potential children have, girls and boys.

Maud Chifamba is an orphaned girl who lost all her parents by the age of 13. She is also a girl who’s shown us rare intelligence which is not found in many children, as she attains this degree at the age of 18, breaking the record in all Africa according to records. Skipping a number of classes in Primary School because of her intelligence as recommended by her primary school teachers, to ‘self-teaching’ in Secondary School up to Advanced level as a result of lack of funding to afford her education, she is one rare breed who broke all odds.

This cannot be said for the thousands of children who like Maud are out of school because of the inability to afford an education. Most children simply cannot self teach, but are faced with social institutional vulnerabilities where they end up being forced into marriages, trafficked to take domestic low paying jobs in the cities or across borders, where they become susceptible to abuse of all forms including sexual exploitation.

Zimbabwe’s Constitution makes education a right for children, according to chapter 27 section 1 which says; “The State must take all practical measures to promote (a) “Free and compulsory basic education for children”. This makes primary and secondary education a must for all children to access, and by access meaning the opportunity to attend quality schools up to high school, within the distance that a child can safely reach. Nyaradzo Mashayamombe, the Executive Director and Founder of TaLI weighed in and said that while we celebrate the achievements that the ‘whizz-kid’ Maud Chifamba has done, the Zimbabwe government and stakeholders have a long way to go in achieving basic education for Zimbabwean children, with thousands still out of school owing to lack of funds to attain an education.

While the constitution has this provision, and also the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education has a policy in place which allows children to stay in school if they cannot afford to pay school fees, the policy does not make it a reality for children who are out of school to be accepted into the schooling system without money. It remains our hope that the responsible authorities revise the existing policies to make all the out of school children, and those in need of second chance education have access to quality education.

TaLI wishes to congratulate all students who graduated or are graduating this season from different colleges, university and schools, and reminds the general Zimbabweans that, when we avail opportunities to children like Maud, girls can be removed from being the face of poverty and HIV, to transforming their own families, communities and society as we know that, empowering a girl means empowering a community. As an organisation, we have enjoyed the working relationship over the years with Maud who has gone on to be an advocate for other young girls and young women, for their rights including ending Gender Based Violence(GBV) in public and private spaces against girls and young women. At a time when the African Union and the world grapples with child marriages and HIV in Africa, prompting education and women leadership remains critical, as good as promoting good governance and accountability, for achieving the sustainable development goals. To Maud we say shine on, there are no limits, and no boundaries.


Girls and Young Women Participation Enabling Environment Begins with Me!

TaLI, Tag a Life, Girl Child, Girl Child Rights in Zimbabwe, Child Marriages in Zimbabwe, Nyaradzo Mashayamombe, Nyari Mashayamombe, Human Rights Activists in Africa, Human Rights, Women's Rights, Chilren's Rights, African Union, Children's Rights, Child Marriages in Southern Africa, Child Marriages in Africa, Girls Education in Zimbabwe, Girl Child in Zimbabwe, Women's Rights in Zimbabwe, Girls in Midlands Province Zimbabwe, Ministry of Education, UNFPA Zimbabwe, UNICEF Zimbabwe, HIV in girls in Zimbabwe, Girls Sexual Reproductive Health, Women's Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Human Rights Activists in Zimbabwe, Children's Rights, TaLI Theory of Change, Girls in Tech, Girls in STERM in Zimbabwe, Lazarus Dokora, UN Women

Over the past seven months I’ve dedicated my career life here at National Endowment for Democracy (NED), to understand further what participation entails. My research has been centered around the participation of girls and young women in leadership and democracy opportunities. This was a build up from my dissertation for my master’s degree which focused on participation of girls and young women in leadership processes in the Midlands Province in Zimbabwe.

In my country when talking about the youths often it refers to the young man who tradition and culture have allowed access, to represent themselves in private and public lives. Private lives at home and public lives in their community and public forums. The World Bank in ‘The Adolescent Initiative’ report state that young women face discrimination, poverty, HIV and they are also treated like second class citizens. This statement agrees with the notion that poverty and HIV has the face of women. These issues are the core of human rights, development and democracy.

Recently there has been a talk of the participation of girls and young women in leadership processes. To women’s and children’s rights activists like myself young women participation means smart democracy. Smart in that the girls are tomorrow’s women, who are also mothers who raise the young women and men with values of democracy. The girls and the women are the fifty percent of beneficiaries of democracy, that alone makes it important that they participate. Participation simply means having the opportunity to represent self in different forums and processes, to be given a voice and autonomy, to be given opportunities and to be treated like equal human beings.

Negative cultural and religious beliefs and practices especially in developing countries are at the centre of gender roles and socialization for girls and boys, women and men. These have caused untold suffering for women and girls as control and power has been vested in boys and men such that girls and women do not have a say in most issues that concern them.

The question I wish to trigger reflection on the reader today is; what is it that we can do in our own individual capacity to translate participation into meaning girls and boys, women and men equally? We often find ourselves at the centre of analyising others, but as activists both women and men, we have left ourselves out in asking the very questions we ask others, not because we have mastered the concept and the practice, but because we naturally sometimes get into the gear of ‘programming’. In our organisations and programmes, how have we excluded women? In our organisations, how have we ensured true participation in decision making, genuine economic, social and other opportunities for young women? On our Boards of Directors as young peoples’ organisations, in our movement building for political processes, have we not fallen into the same trap as what we often complain against politicians that they use women as and when suit them and leave them when they’ve won elections?

This is a call to reflect for us human rights activists and democrats to say, inclusion, equality and participation of women and girls begins with us. It must reflect in our governance structures right at the top. Democracy must begin with us and democracy isn’t just about elections, but also about human rights, the rule of law and citizenry engagement among other things, and it takes the 50% of the country thus women, to be equal participants at every level. It begins with us!

Nyaradzo “Nyari” Mashayamombe is the founder and executive director of Tag a Life International Trust, a girl child rights organisation. She is a development consultant focusing on Africa, entrepreneur and musician. She sits on regional and international boards. For further engagement with her, visit her website www.nyarimashayamombe.com. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Article on Child Marriages

Child marriage as a vice which has been on the global agenda for years and having a lot of advocacy carried out has now started to yield results. Child brides are often disempowered, lacking autonomy and deprived of their fundamental rights to health, education and safety. With reports showing that Zimbabwe is among Africa’s leading countries when it comes to child marriages, the Constitutional Court (Concourt)’s ruling on the ban of child marriages marked a new beginning for Zimbabwe. After decades of being robbed of their childhood, girls in Zimbabwe today have been given an opportunity to be just that, ‘girls’ and not brides.

For years now, Tag a Life has been advocating for the ban of child marriages and continues to do so acknowledging that having a provision in the Constitution does not guarantee an automatic eradication of the child marriages, therefore, voices still need to be amplified around this issue. Over the years, the very same men meant to be fathers and custodians of the girl child are the very same men who abuse the girl child, hindering her from experiencing life to its fullest and this has been done mostly in the name of culture and religion, shameful and revolting.

TaLI celebrated through the Victory March on the 3rd of February 2016 for the ban of child marriages in Zimbabwe together with others acknowledging the organisation’s efforts as the Coordinators of Girls Not Brides Zimbabwe chapter for more than 2 years building to the ruling. The organization is part of the Women’s Coalition of Zimbabwe working group on child marriages and progress made thus far includes the production of a position paper and advocacy strategy. Under the Coalition, TaLI has been part of community discussions in the communities and recently, in Mbare, it was interesting for TaLI to discover that child marriages are facilitated by reasons such as teenage pregnancy in that area. A vast number of points were highlighted and these assist in mapping the way forward in the bid to end child marriages.

TaLI has been over the years, implementing programmes that meant to avert child marriages in the in the Midlands Province in Zimbabwe, which itself has 24.7% proportion of female teenage marriages and 15% proportion of child mothers (Zimbabwe 2012, Population Census Results). The proportion of teenage pregnancies and child mothers is high within the districts where TaLI is implementing its programs for example the proportion of teenage pregnancies in Kwekwe, Zvishavane and Shurugwi is 25.7%, 21.6% and 25.6% respectively and the proportion of child mothers is 21.7%, 15.4% and 15.8% for Kwekwe, Zvishavane and Shurugwi respectively. Supported by programmes such as the U S Embassy in Harare and PEPFAR, TaLI has worked with families and communities to address issues of harmful religions and cultural practices that expose girls to vulnerabilities such as child marriages. This is because the families and communities are the custodians of girls’ rights and working with them will ensure girls’ access to their rights. Since 2010, the organisation has been engaging schools and communities in Shurugwi, Kwekwe, Zvishavane and Gweru districts to create awareness on the rights of girls, addressing the issue of child marriages among other issues. To date, the organisation has reached more than 143 000 people both young and old, advocating for girls rights in the communities.

The Concourt ruling certainly marked the beginning of new days for the girls in Zimbabwe however the real work is in transforming that law to benefit the girls and young women, a mammoth task which requires political will, resources and changed communities to make that a reality. There is need for implementation of the law as well as the realignment and repealing of certain sections of the law, which contradict the Child Marriages law. A few sounds of victory or a victory march are not where we should end, there is so much to this journey that has just begun. As an organisation, TaLI remains committed to ending gender based violence, child marriages and increasing opportunities for education for girls and young women. Advocacy for girls and young women’s rights in their families, communities, nation, region and globally remains our focus and we seek ways in increasing partnerships and the ability to deliver such programmes to benefit and improve their lives.

TaLI SUCCESSFULLY HOSTS THE INAUGRAL 'AFRICAN GIRLS R US' FUNDRAISING DINNER

TaLI SUCCESSFULLY HOSTS THE INAUGRAL 'AFRICAN GIRLS R US' FUNDRAISING DINNER

On the 29th of October 2015 at the prestigious Meikles Hotel, TaLI successfully hosted the first ever Fundraising dinner under the theme ‘ African Girls R Us’.

On the night TaLI celebrated it’s 5th year anniversary as well as launched TaLI’s five year strategic plan and the Evaluation report. The latter was commissioned with the aim of assessing the impact of TaLI work over the past five years from 2010 to 2014.

The night turned out to be a joyous celebration and resounding success was capped by the presentation of the inaugural TaLI Children’s Human Rights Awards (TCHRAs).

We would like to take this opportunity to thank every individual and organisation that supported TaLI, we would not have managed to do it without you, and special mention goes to the following:

Distinct Studios

Lighthouse Print Zimbabwe

Homezim

Premier Sounds

Securico pvt

First Mutual Life

BakerTilly Gwatidzo

Dr Eve Gadzikwa

Mrs Divine Ndlukula

Tsitsi Mutendi

Mr Rusike

Confronting Gender-Based Violence: Empowerment through Economic Opportunity

Confronting Gender-Based Violence: Empowerment through Economic Opportunity

In a panel of 3 experts from across the world, Nyaradzo's focus was on Zimbabwe and Southern Africa. Discussion focused on how women's economic empowerment helps reduce gender-based violence and how women can be supported to gain greater input into governance and public policymaking in order to have more say in the policies and laws that affect their lives. Panelists drew on their experiences working to improve the lives of women around the globe, including country-specific expertise gained in the South Pacific, South Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. Please watch the recording here: https:

Youtube Video

WHAT IF WE CATCH THEM YOUNG - NYARADZO MASHAYAMOMBE

WHAT IF WE CATCH THEM YOUNG?

TaLI founder and Executive Director, Nyaradzo Mashayamombe, is now a contributor to the national newspaper the Standard as the author of the weekly column looking at Women and development.

This week her article focused on boys, particularly making sure that we did not breed in them negative masculinities as they grow up to be men. This negative masculinities include being forceful , arrogant and aggressive.

Here is short insert from the article:

“Our boys grow up being socialised around issues of how strong a man should be, and that kind of strength that I am talking about is that of physique and not showing emotions. The boys are taught not to cry when they face pain because they are told “men don’t cry”. In those moments they are taught to be aggressive and traces of violence begin to crop into their character, because if they can’t cry, where is the anger going to?”To read the rest of the article follow the link below and do not hesitate to share it with friends and family!!!

http://www.thestandard.co.zw/2015/10/21/what-if-we-catch-them-young/

THE GIRL CHILD PERSPECTIVE - 21 OCTOBER 2015

THE GIRL CHILD PERSPECTIVE - 21 OCTOBER 2015

Good Morning guys welcome to our weekly look at the most interesting stories in the papers this week. Lets get straight in to it:

1. What if we catch them young? ;

http://www.thestandard.co.zw/2015/10/21/what-if-we-catch-them-young/

2. ZIMSEC engages police to curb recurrent leakages;

http://www.herald.co.zw/zimsec-engages-police-to-curb-recurrent-leakages/

3. Pastor in court for sodomy;

http://www.herald.co.zw/pastor-in-court-for-sodomy/

4. Obstetric fistula patient speaks out;

http://www.thestandard.co.zw/2015/10/18/obstetric-fistula-patient-speaks-out/

5. Toddler burnt to death;

http://www.herald.co.zw/toddler-burnt-to-death/

6. Teacher beats lover to death over 3 days and sleeps with corpse;

http://www.chronicle.co.zw/teacher-beats-lover-to-death-over-three-days-sleeps-with-corpse/

7. Pistorious gets out of jail on parole;

http://www.chronicle.co.zw/pistorious-gets-out-of-jail-on-parole/

#LetsEndGenderBasedViolenceViolence #SafePlacesForGirlsAndYoungWomen #TaLIat5

Please don't hesitate to share you opinion on any of the above stories or to share any storiesyou found interesting that weren't listed above.

INVITATIONS FOR NOMATIONS OF THE TaLI CHILDREN’S HUMAN RIGHTS AWARDS (TCHRAs)

INVITATIONS FOR NOMATIONS OF THE TaLI CHILDREN’S HUMAN RIGHTS AWARDS (TCHRAs)

Tag a Life International (TaLI)is a girl’s rights organisation, working towards creating a safe place for the girl child through an inclusive approach which reaches to boys, men, women and all duty bearers for the safeguarding of girls rights.

TaLI is celebrating its 5th anniversary this year (2015) and it is against this background that the organisation will be hosting a Fundraising Dinner, under the theme, ‘African Girls R Us’; to promote girls rights and their protection. The dinner will be on the 29th of October 2015 at the prestigious Meikles Hotel. Inspired by the desire to provide sustainable financial solutions towards the provision of Support and Security to survivors of abuse(rape) especially Girls, the organisation hosts its first ever dinner. Corporate and individual will grace the occasion.

As the organisation celebrates this milestone, the organisation has lined up a number of initiatives to enhance its work and celebrate those that work tirelessly in promoting the rights of children especially girls as the organisation turns 5. It is against this background that this Call for Nominations of the TaLI Children’s Human Rights Awards(TCHRAs) are hereby announced. TaLI recognises that there is a need to honour individuals and organisations who have passionately dedicated their lives and work towards making ‘The world a safe place for the Girl Child’ and thus on the night of the celebrations, we honor them with these 5 awards. Child rights champions ranging from Sexual Reproductive Health Rights, HIV Prevention and Management, Gender Based Violence(GBV), Psycho Social Support, Girls Participation & Leadership and Life Skills Building are welcome to apply for themselves or be nominated by others.

Nominations are invited for the following Awards and the due date for nominations is the 23rd of October 2015. (One can be nominated by someone else or can self nominate).

NAME AND DESCRIPTION OF THE AWARDS:

1. Ubuntu Communal Effort Award- this will be a community award for communities that collectively work towards the attainment of Girl Child rights. This award can go towards a School, A village, in other cases to the Local Leader that includes the Chiefs and Head man.

2. The Tsitsi Stacey Munjoma Child Protection Award –(To honour the late 10 year old, Tsitsi Stacey Munjoma who was raped and subsequently murdered in 2013). This is an award that recognizes individuals that effortlessly work towards the protection of the Girl Child in our communities. They speak out against abuse, they assist children to report cases and they name and shame perpetrators through working with local NGOs, police or anyone who cares about child protection.

3. Humanitarian Child Rights Award- This is to award a media personality who has championed the girl child and GBV issues in the last year.

4. Child Rights Champion Award- To honour Gender Equality Activists in our communities and societies who have out rightly spoken against abuse of children especially girls, who have advocated through their local leaders, community leaders or national leaders for child rights.

5. Girl Leadership Award- to honour individuals and organizations that work towards the empowerment of girls. These vary from Economic, Social and Political participation and empowerment.

6. The Girl Child Achiever of the Year- This is to acknowledge the effort and hard work put in by a girl child during the year and to motivate other girls to achieve much and realize that there are no limits. This award is not open to nominations, the organizers will identify girls who will have excelled during that year.

We encourage you to nominate individuals and organisations that you deem worthy of the Awards mentioned above as evidenced by the work they have done thus far. To nominate, please follow this link, complete the form and submit online your application. http://www.tagalife.org/index.php/awards. For those in rural communities(or urban) and cannot access internet but would like to nominate someone, Please use the titles on the Form and complete and send via Whatsapp. Should you choose to send via Whatsapp, Please make sure you send all your information as one message. Failure to do this will result in disqualification. To use whatsapp to respond, please give us the following information;

Name & Surname:

Title:

Age:

Email:

Phone No:

Name of Award:

Please use the space below to describe the Professional background and Work of the nominee. Be as brief and to the point as possible (No more than 200 words:

Nominator.

Full Names:

Address:

Phone No:

The Whatsapp number is +263 777 549090.

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TaLI Turning 5 Celebrations

Where We Work

  • Shurugwi
  • Gweru
  • Kwekwe
  • Zvishavane
  • Marondera
  • Uzumba
  • Maramba
  • Pfungwe
  • Harare